Markey, Blumenthal Welcome Judge’s Approval Of VW Settlement

(WASHINGTON, DC) – U.S. Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-CT) and Edward J. Markey (D-MA) today welcomed a federal judge’s approval of the $14.7 billion settlement between Volkswagen (VW), the federal government and vehicle owners over the automaker’s vehicle emission scandal. Today’s approval means the process of compensating owners will begin shortly. Owners of some impacted VW models will be able to have their vehicles fixed to meet emissions standards or a full buy-back option at pre-scandal blue book value, while damages suffered by owners of other models are not covered in the settlement approved today.

Below is a joint statement from Senators Blumenthal and Markey, members of the Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee:

 

“Now that this historic $14.7 billion settlement is final, consumers cheated by Volkswagen can have their vehicles repaired or repurchased and move forward with this scandal in their rearview mirror. The settlement provides a measure of accountability not only for vehicle owners who were deceived by the company, but also for our environment that was shamefully polluted by VW’s unclean diesel vehicles. While today’s action is an important step, we must continue fighting to ensure VW vehicle owners not covered by this settlement receive equal compensation.”

In February, Senators Markey and Blumenthal and Reps. Bobby Rush (D-Ill.) and Frank Pallone (D-N.J.) introduced the Compensating Losses to the Environment from Automobiles with Noxious Undisclosed Pollution (CLEAN-UP) Act, legislation that would deny Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) credits to any auto manufacturer that circumvents emissions control requirements and would use monies collected from automakers that violate the law to be made available to programs that restore and improve air quality. The Senators also urged VW to ensure that owners of VW vehicles containing emission defeat devices are offered multiple options for adequate compensation for the damages and inconveniences incurred on them by the company’s deception.